Timeline

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(c. 8th century BCE)

Homer 

A legendary ancient Greek poet traditionally credited with the authorship of the epic poems “The Iliad” and “The Odyssey,” which are among the foundational works of Western literature.

(c. 630 – c. 570 BCE)

Sappho  

An ancient Greek poet known for her lyric poetry, which often celebrated love and beauty, and for her association with the island of Lesbos, which led to the modern term “lesbian.”

(70 BCE – 19 BCE)

Virgil
 
A Roman poet known for his epic poem “The Aeneid,” which tells the story of the Trojan hero Aeneas and his journey to found Rome.

(43 BCE – 17/18 CE)

Ovid  

A Roman poet known for his works, including “Metamorphoses,” which tells the stories of various myths and legends through the theme of transformation.

(1265 – 1321)

Dante Alighieri 

An Italian poet known for his epic poem “The Divine Comedy,” which describes his journey through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven and is considered one of the greatest works of Italian literature.

(c. 1343 – 1400)

Geoffrey Chaucer

An English poet known for his works, including “The Canterbury Tales,” which consists of a series of stories told by a group of pilgrims traveling to Canterbury.

(1547 – 1616)

Miguel de Cervantes
 

A Spanish novelist, playwright, and poet known for his novel “Don Quixote,” which is considered one of the greatest works of Spanish and world literature.

(1564 – 1616)

William Shakespeare

An English playwright and poet known for his works, including plays such as “Hamlet,” “Romeo and Juliet,” and “Macbeth,” which are considered among the greatest works of English literature.

(1608 – 1674)

John Milton

An English poet known for his epic poem “Paradise Lost,” which tells the story of Adam and Eve’s fall from grace and is considered one of the greatest works of English literature.

(1749-1832)

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

A German author, poet, and philosopher known for works such as “Faust” and “The Sorrows of Young Werther,” which explore themes of human emotions and the human condition.

(1770 – 1850)

William Wordsworth

An English Romantic poet known for his celebration of nature and the human imagination, particularly in works such as “The Prelude” and “Lyrical Ballads.”

(1772 – 1834)
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
 
An English poet and philosopher known for his collaborations with Wordsworth and his poems, including “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” and “Kubla Khan.”

(1775 – 1817)

Jane Austen
 
An English novelist known for her social commentary and wit, particularly in works such as “Pride and Prejudice” and “Sense and Sensibility.”

(1792 – 1822)

Percy Bysshe Shelley
 

An English Romantic poet known for his idealism and his poems, including “Ode to the West Wind” and “Prometheus Unbound.”

(1795 – 1821)

John Keats

An English Romantic poet known for his sensuous imagery and his poems, including “Ode to a Nightingale” and “Endymion.”

(1802-1885)

Victor Hugo
 

A French poet, novelist, and playwright known for his works, including “Les Misérables” and “The Hunchback of Notre-Dame,” which often explore themes of social injustice, love, and the human condition.

(1804 – 1864)

Nathaniel Hawthorne

An American author best known for his novel “The Scarlet Letter,” which explores themes of sin, guilt, and redemption in Puritan New England.

(1809 – 1849)
Edgar Allan Poe
 

An American author, poet, and literary critic known for his Gothic and horror fiction, including works such as “The Raven” and “The Tell-Tale Heart.”

(1812 – 1870)
Charles Dickens
 
An English novelist known for his social commentary and his works, including “Oliver Twist,” “Great Expectations,” and “A Tale of Two Cities.”

(1818 – 1848)

Emily Bronte

An English novelist and poet known for her Gothic novel “Wuthering Heights,” which explores themes of love, revenge, and the supernatural.

(1819-1891)

Herman Melville

An American novelist known for his novel “Moby-Dick,” which explores themes of obsession, fate, and the human condition.

(1819 – 1892)

Walt Whitman
 

An American poet known for his collection “Leaves of Grass,” which celebrates the beauty of nature and the individual self. His poetry is known for its free verse and unconventional style.

(1821 – 1881)

Fyodor Dostoevsky 

A Russian author known for his psychological novels, including “Crime and Punishment” and “The Brothers Karamazov,” which explore themes of morality, guilt, and redemption.

(1821-1880)

Gustave Flaubert

A French author known for his novel “Madame Bovary,” which explores themes of adultery, sexuality, and the emptiness of bourgeois life.

(1828 – 1910)

Leo Tolstoy

A Russian author and philosopher known for his epic novels, including “War and Peace” and “Anna Karenina,” which explore themes of love, family, and the human condition.

(1830 – 1886)

Emily Dickinson

An American poet known for her unconventional style and themes of death, nature, and the self. Her poetry was not widely recognized until after her death.

(1835 – 1910)

Mark Twain

An American author and humorist known for his satirical novels, including “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” and “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” which often poke fun at American society and politics.

(1840 – 1928)

Thomas Hardy

An English author and poet known for his novels, including “Tess of the d’Urbervilles” and “Jude the Obscure,” which often explore themes of social class, gender, and morality.

(1854-1900)

Oscar Wilde

An Irish author and playwright known for his wit and his works, including the novel “The Picture of Dorian Gray” and the play “The Importance of Being Earnest,” which often critique Victorian society and its values.

(1882 – 1941)

James Joyce

An Irish author known for his modernist novel “Ulysses,” which follows a day in the life of Leopold Bloom and explores themes of identity, sexuality, and Irish nationalism.

(1818 – 1848)

Emily Bronte

An English novelist and poet known for her Gothic novel “Wuthering Heights,” which explores themes of love, revenge, and the supernatural.

(1818 – 1848)

Emily Bronte

An English novelist and poet known for her Gothic novel “Wuthering Heights,” which explores themes of love, revenge, and the supernatural.

(1818 – 1848)

Emily Bronte

An English novelist and poet known for her Gothic novel “Wuthering Heights,” which explores themes of love, revenge, and the supernatural.

(1818 – 1848)

Emily Bronte

An English novelist and poet known for her Gothic novel “Wuthering Heights,” which explores themes of love, revenge, and the supernatural.

(1818 – 1848)

Emily Bronte

An English novelist and poet known for her Gothic novel “Wuthering Heights,” which explores themes of love, revenge, and the supernatural.

(1818 – 1848)

Emily Bronte

An English novelist and poet known for her Gothic novel “Wuthering Heights,” which explores themes of love, revenge, and the supernatural.

(1818 – 1848)

Emily Bronte

An English novelist and poet known for her Gothic novel “Wuthering Heights,” which explores themes of love, revenge, and the supernatural.

(1818 – 1848)

Emily Bronte

An English novelist and poet known for her Gothic novel “Wuthering Heights,” which explores themes of love, revenge, and the supernatural.

Behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there

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